IT. Expert System.

C

circularlinkedlist


Circular linked list is a more complicated linked data structure. In this the elements can be placed anywhere in the heap memory unlike array which uses contiguous locations. Nodes in a linked list are linked together using a next field, which stores the address of the next node in the next field of the previous node i.e. each node of the list refers to its successor and the last node points back to the first node unlike singly linked list. It has a dynamic size, which can be determined only at run time.

Syntax:
Syntax doesn't exist.


Example:

#include
#include
typedef struct Node 
{
        int data;
        struct Node *next;
}node;
void insert(node *pointer, int data)
{
        node *start = pointer;
        /* Iterate through the list till we encounter the last node.*/
        while(pointer->next!=start)
        {
                pointer = pointer -> next;
        }
        /* Allocate memory for the new node and put data in it.*/
        pointer->next = (node *)malloc(sizeof(node));
        pointer = pointer->next;
        pointer->data = data;
        pointer->next = start;
}
int find(node *pointer, int key)
{
        node *start = pointer;
        pointer =  pointer -> next; //First node is dummy node.
        /* Iterate through the entire linked list and search for the key. */
        while(pointer!=start)
        {
                if(pointer->data == key) //key is found.
                {
                        return 1;
                }
                pointer = pointer -> next;//Search in the next node.
        }
        /*Key is not found */
        return 0;
}
void delete(node *pointer, int data)
{
        node *start = pointer;
        /* Go to the node for which the node next to it has to be deleted */
        while(pointer->next!=start && (pointer->next)->data != data)
        {
                pointer = pointer -> next;
        }
        if(pointer->next==start)
        {
                printf("Element %d is not present in the list\n",data);
                return;
        }
        /* Now pointer points to a node and the node next to it has to be removed */
        node *temp;
        temp = pointer -> next;
        /*temp points to the node which has to be removed*/
        pointer->next = temp->next;
        /*We removed the node which is next to the pointer (which is also temp) */
        free(temp);
        /* Beacuse we deleted the node, we no longer require the memory used for it . 
           free() will deallocate the memory.
         */
        return;
}
void print(node *start,node *pointer)
{
        if(pointer==start)
        {
                return;
        }
        printf("%d ",pointer->data);
        print(start,pointer->next);
}
int main()
{
        /* start always points to the first node of the linked list.
           temp is used to point to the last node of the linked list.*/
        node *start,*temp;
        start = (node *)malloc(sizeof(node)); 
        temp = start;
        temp -> next = start;
        /* Here in this code, we take the first node as a dummy node.
           The first node does not contain data, but it used because to avoid handling special cases
           in insert and delete functions.
         */
        printf("1. Insert\n");
        printf("2. Delete\n");
        printf("3. Print\n");
        printf("4. Find\n");
        while(1)
        {
                int query;
                scanf("%d",&query);
                if(query==1)
                {
                        int data;
                        scanf("%d",&data);
                        insert(start,data);
                }
                else if(query==2)
                {
                        int data;
                        scanf("%d",&data);
                        delete(start,data);
                }
                else if(query==3)
                {
                        printf("The list is ");
                        print(start,start->next);
                        printf("\n");
                }
                else if(query==4)
                {
                        int data;
                        scanf("%d",&data);
                        int status = find(start,data);
                        if(status)
                        {
                                printf("Element Found\n");
                        }
                        else
                        {
                                printf("Element Not Found\n");

                        }
                }
        }


}


Content

Android Reference

Java basics

Java Enterprise Edition (EE)

Java Standard Edition (SE)

SQL

HTML

PHP

CSS

Java Script

MYSQL

JQUERY

VBS

REGEX

C

C++

C#

Design patterns

RFC (standard status)

RFC (proposed standard status)

RFC (draft standard status)

RFC (informational status)

RFC (experimental status)

RFC (best current practice status)

RFC (historic status)

RFC (unknown status)

IT dictionary

License.
All information of this service is derived from the free sources and is provided solely in the form of quotations. This service provides information and interfaces solely for the familiarization (not ownership) and under the "as is" condition.
Copyright 2016 © ELTASK.COM. All rights reserved.
Site is optimized for mobile devices.
Downloads: 2767 / . Delta: 0.01927 с