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C#

Query expressions


Query expressions provide a language integrated syntax for queries that is similar to relational and hierarchical query languages such as SQL and XQuery.

query-expression:
from-clause query-body

from-clause:
from typeopt identifier in expression

query-body:
query-body-clausesopt select-or-group-clause query-continuationopt

query-body-clauses:
query-body-clause
query-body-clauses query-body-clause

query-body-clause:
from-clause
let-clause
where-clause
join-clause
join-into-clause
orderby-clause

let-clause:
let identifier = expression

where-clause:
where boolean-expression

join-clause:
join typeopt identifier in expression on expression equals expression

join-into-clause:
join typeopt identifier in expression on expression equals expression into identifier

orderby-clause:
orderby orderings

orderings:
ordering
orderings , ordering

ordering:
expression ordering-directionopt

ordering-direction:
ascending
descending

select-or-group-clause:
select-clause
group-clause

select-clause:
select expression

group-clause:
group expression by expression

query-continuation:
into identifier query-body

A query expression begins with a from clause and ends with either a select or group clause. The initial from clause can be followed by zero or more from, let, where, join or orderby clauses. Each from clause is a generator introducing a range variable which ranges over the elements of a sequence. Each let clause introduces a range variable representing a value computed by means of previous range variables. Each where clause is a filter that excludes items from the result. Each join clause compares specified keys of the source sequence with keys of another sequence, yielding matching pairs. Each orderby clause reorders items according to specified criteria.The final select or group clause specifies the shape of the result in terms of the range variables. Finally, an into clause can be used to “splice” queries by treating the results of one query as a generator in a subsequent query.

      1. Ambiguities in query expressions

Query expressions contain a number of “contextual keywords”, i.e., identifiers that have special meaning in a given context. Specifically these are from, where, join, on, equals, into, let, orderby, ascending, descending, select, group and by. In order to avoid ambiguities in query expressions caused by mixed use of these identifiers as keywords or simple names, these identifiers are considered keywords when occurring anywhere within a query expression.

For this purpose, a query expression is any expression that starts with “from identifierfollowed by any token except “;”, “=” or “,”.

In order to use these words as identifiers within a query expression, they can be prefixed with “@” .

      1. Query expression translation

The C# language does not specify the execution semantics of query expressions. Rather, query expressions are translated into invocations of methods that adhere to the query expression pattern . Specifically, query expressions are translated into invocations of methods named Where, Select, SelectMany, Join, GroupJoin, OrderBy, OrderByDescending, ThenBy, ThenByDescending, GroupBy, and Cast.These methods are expected to have particular signatures and result types, as described in §7.15.3. These methods can be instance methods of the object being queried or extension methods that are external to the object, and they implement the actual execution of the query.

The translation from query expressions to method invocations is a syntactic mapping that occurs before any type binding or overload resolution has been performed. The translation is guaranteed to be syntactically correct, but it is not guaranteed to produce semantically correct C# code. Following translation of query expressions, the resulting method invocations are processed as regular method invocations, and this may in turn uncover errors, for example if the methods do not exist, if arguments have wrong types, or if the methods are generic and type inference fails.

A query expression is processed by repeatedly applying the following translations until no further reductions are possible. The translations are listed in order of application: each section assumes that the translations in the preceding sections have been performed exhaustively, and once exhausted, a section will not later be revisited in the processing of the same query expression.

Certain translations inject range variables with transparent identifiers denoted by *. The special properties of transparent identifiers are discussed further in §7.15.2.7.

        1. Select and groupby clauses with continuations

A query expression with a continuation

from into x

is translated into

from x in ( from )

The translations in the following sections assume that queries have no into continuations.

The example

from c in customers
group c by c.Country into g
select new { Country = g.Key, CustCount = g.Count() }

is translated into

from g in
from c in customers
group c by c.Country
select new { Country = g.Key, CustCount = g.Count() }

the final translation of which is

customers.
GroupBy(c => c.Country).
Select(g => new { Country = g.Key, CustCount = g.Count() })

        1. Explicit range variable types

A from clause that explicitly specifies a range variable type

from T x in e

is translated into

from x in ( e ) . Cast < T > ( )

A join clause that explicitly specifies a range variable type

join T x in e on k1 equals k2

is translated into

join x in ( e ) . Cast < T > ( ) on k1 equals k2

The translations in the following sections assume that queries have no explicit range variable types.

The example

from Customer c in customers
where c.City == "London"
select c

is translated into

from c in customers.Cast<Customer>()
where c.City == "London"
select c

the final translation of which is

customers.
Cast<Customer>().
Where(c => c.City == "London")

Explicit range variable types are useful for querying collections that implement the non-generic IEnumerable interface, but not the generic IEnumerable<T> interface. In the example above, this would be the case if customers were of type ArrayList.

        1. Degenerate query expressions

A query expression of the form

from x in e select x

is translated into

( e ) . Select ( x => x )

The example

from c in customers
select c

Is translated into

customers.Select(c => c)

A degenerate query expression is one that trivially selects the elements of the source. A later phase of the translation removes degenerate queries introduced by other translation steps by replacing them with their source. It is important however to ensure that the result of a query expression is never the source object itself, as that would reveal the type and identity of the source to the client of the query. Therefore this step protects degenerate queries written directly in source code by explicitly calling Select on the source. It is then up to the implementers of Select and other query operators to ensure that these methods never return the source object itself.

        1. From, let, where, join and orderby clauses

A query expression with a second from clause followed by a select clause

from x1 in e1
from x2 in e2
select v

is translated into

( e1 ) . SelectMany( x1 => e2 , ( x1 , x2 ) => v )

A query expression with a second from clause followed by something other than a select clause:

from x1 in e1
from x2 in e2

is translated into

from * in ( e1 ) . SelectMany( x1 => e2 , ( x1 , x2 ) => new { x1 , x2 } )

A query expression with a let clause

from x in e
let y = f

is translated into

from * in ( e ) . Select ( x => new { x , y = f } )

A query expression with a where clause

from x in e
where f

is translated into

from x in ( e ) . Where ( x => f )

A query expression with a join clause without an into followed by a select clause

from x1 in e1
join x2 in e2 on k1 equals k2
select v

is translated into

( e1 ) . Join( e2 , x1 => k1 , x2 => k2 , ( x1 , x2 ) => v )

A query expression with a join clause without an into followed by something other than a select clause

from x1 in e1
join x2 in e2 on k1 equals k2

is translated into

from * in ( e1 ) . Join(
e2 , x1 => k1 , x2 => k2 , ( x1 , x2 ) => new { x1 , x2 })

A query expression with a join clause with an into followed by a select clause

from x1 in e1
join x2 in e2 on k1 equals k2 into g
select v

is translated into

( e1 ) . GroupJoin( e2 , x1 => k1 , x2 => k2 , ( x1 , g ) => v )

A query expression with a join clause with an into followed by something other than a select clause

from x1 in e1
join x2 in e2 on k1 equals k2 into g

is translated into

from * in ( e1 ) . GroupJoin(
e2 , x1 => k1 , x2 => k2 , ( x1 , g ) => new { x1 , g })

A query expression with an orderby clause

from x in e
orderby k1 , k2 , … , kn

is translated into

from x in ( e ) .
OrderBy ( x => k1 ) .
ThenBy ( x => k2 ) .
.
ThenBy ( x => kn )

If an ordering clause specifies a descending direction indicator, an invocation of OrderByDescending or ThenByDescending is produced instead.

The following translations assume that there are no let, where, join or orderby clauses, and no more than the one initial from clause in each query expression.

The example

from c in customers
from o in c.Orders
select new { c.Name, o.OrderID, o.Total }

is translated into

customers.
SelectMany(c => c.Orders,
(c,o) => new { c.Name, o.OrderID, o.Total }
)

The example

from c in customers
from o in c.Orders
orderby o.Total descending
select new { c.Name, o.OrderID, o.Total }

is translated into

from * in customers.
SelectMany(c => c.Orders, (c,o) => new { c, o })
orderby o.Total descending
select new { c.Name, o.OrderID, o.Total }

the final translation of which is

customers.
SelectMany(c => c.Orders, (c,o) => new { c, o }).
OrderByDescending(x => x.o.Total).
Select(x => new { x.c.Name, x.o.OrderID, x.o.Total })

where x is a compiler generated identifier that is otherwise invisible and inaccessible.

The example

from o in orders
let t = o.Details.Sum(d => d.UnitPrice * d.Quantity)
where t >= 1000
select new { o.OrderID, Total = t }

is translated into

from * in orders.
Select(o => new { o, t = o.Details.Sum(d => d.UnitPrice * d.Quantity) })
where t >= 1000
select new { o.OrderID, Total = t }

the final translation of which is

orders.
Select(o => new { o, t = o.Details.Sum(d => d.UnitPrice * d.Quantity) }).
Where(x => x.t >= 1000).
Select(x => new { x.o.OrderID, Total = x.t })

where x is a compiler generated identifier that is otherwise invisible and inaccessible.

The example

from c in customers
join o in orders on c.CustomerID equals o.CustomerID
select new { c.Name, o.OrderDate, o.Total }

is translated into

customers.Join(orders, c => c.CustomerID, o => o.CustomerID,
(c, o) => new { c.Name, o.OrderDate, o.Total })

The example

from c in customers
join o in orders on c.CustomerID equals o.CustomerID into co
let n = co.Count()
where n >= 10
select new { c.Name, OrderCount = n }

is translated into

from * in customers.
GroupJoin(orders, c => c.CustomerID, o => o.CustomerID,
(c, co) => new { c, co })
let n = co.Count()
where n >= 10
select new { c.Name, OrderCount = n }

the final translation of which is

customers.
GroupJoin(orders, c => c.CustomerID, o => o.CustomerID,
(c, co) => new { c, co }).
Select(x => new { x, n = x.co.Count() }).
Where(y => y.n >= 10).
Select(y => new { y.x.c.Name, OrderCount = y.n)

where x and y are compiler generated identifiers that are otherwise invisible and inaccessible.

The example

from o in orders
orderby o.Customer.Name, o.Total descending
select o

has the final translation

orders.
OrderBy(o => o.Customer.Name).
ThenByDescending(o => o.Total)

        1. Select clauses

A query expression of the form

from x in e select v

is translated into

( e ) . Select ( x => v )

except when v is the identifier x, the translation is simply

( e )

For example

from c in customers.Where(c => c.City == “London”)
select c

is simply translated into

customers.Where(c => c.City == “London”)

        1. Groupby clauses

A query expression of the form

from x in e group v by k

is translated into

( e ) . GroupBy ( x => k , x => v )

except when v is the identifier x, the translation is

( e ) . GroupBy ( x => k )

The example

from c in customers
group c.Name by c.Country

is translated into

customers.
GroupBy(c => c.Country, c => c.Name)

        1. Transparent identifiers

Certain translations inject range variables with transparent identifiers denoted by *. Transparent identifiers are not a proper language feature; they exist only as an intermediate step in the query expression translation process.

When a query translation injects a transparent identifier, further translation steps propagate the transparent identifier into anonymous functions and anonymous object initializers. In those contexts, transparent identifiers have the following behavior:

  • When a transparent identifier occurs as a parameter in an anonymous function, the members of the associated anonymous type are automatically in scope in the body of the anonymous function.

  • When a member with a transparent identifier is in scope, the members of that member are in scope as well.

  • When a transparent identifier occurs as a member declarator in an anonymous object initializer, it introduces a member with a transparent identifier.

In the translation steps described above, transparent identifiers are always introduced together with anonymous types, with the intent of capturing multiple range variables as members of a single object. An implementation of C# is permitted to use a different mechanism than anonymous types to group together multiple range variables. The following translation examples assume that anonymous types are used, and show how transparent identifiers can be translated away.

The example

from c in customers
from o in c.Orders
orderby o.Total descending
select new { c.Name, o.Total }

is translated into

from * in customers.
SelectMany(c => c.Orders, (c,o) => new { c, o })
orderby o.Total descending
select new { c.Name, o.Total }

which is further translated into

customers.
SelectMany(c => c.Orders, (c,o) => new { c, o }).
OrderByDescending(* => o.Total).
Select(* => new { c.Name, o.Total })

which, when transparent identifiers are erased, is equivalent to

customers.
SelectMany(c => c.Orders, (c,o) => new { c, o }).
OrderByDescending(x => x.o.Total).
Select(x => new { x.c.Name, x.o.Total })

where x is a compiler generated identifier that is otherwise invisible and inaccessible.

The example

from c in customers
join o in orders on c.CustomerID equals o.CustomerID
join d in details on o.OrderID equals d.OrderID
join p in products on d.ProductID equals p.ProductID
select new { c.Name, o.OrderDate, p.ProductName }

is translated into

from * in customers.
Join(orders, c => c.CustomerID, o => o.CustomerID,
(c, o) => new { c, o })
join d in details on o.OrderID equals d.OrderID
join p in products on d.ProductID equals p.ProductID
select new { c.Name, o.OrderDate, p.ProductName }

which is further reduced to

customers.
Join(orders, c => c.CustomerID, o => o.CustomerID, (c, o) => new { c, o }).
Join(details, * => o.OrderID, d => d.OrderID, (*, d) => new { *, d }).
Join(products, * => d.ProductID, p => p.ProductID, (*, p) => new { *, p }).
Select(* => new { c.Name, o.OrderDate, p.ProductName })

the final translation of which is

customers.
Join(orders, c => c.CustomerID, o => o.CustomerID,
(c, o) => new { c, o }).
Join(details, x => x.o.OrderID, d => d.OrderID,
(x, d) => new { x, d }).
Join(products, y => y.d.ProductID, p => p.ProductID,
(y, p) => new { y, p }).
Select(z => new { z.y.x.c.Name, z.y.x.o.OrderDate, z.p.ProductName })

where x, y, and z are compiler generated identifiers that are otherwise invisible and inaccessible.

      1. The query expression pattern

The Query expression pattern establishes a pattern of methods that types can implement to support query expressions. Because query expressions are translated to method invocations by means of a syntactic mapping, types have considerable flexibility in how they implement the query expression pattern. For example, the methods of the pattern can be implemented as instance methods or as extension methods because the two have the same invocation syntax, and the methods can request delegates or expression trees because anonymous functions are convertible to both.

The recommended shape of a generic type C<T> that supports the query expression pattern is shown below. A generic type is used in order to illustrate the proper relationships between parameter and result types, but it is possible to implement the pattern for non-generic types as well.

delegate R Func<T1,R>(T1 arg1);

delegate R Func<T1,T2,R>(T1 arg1, T2 arg2);

class C
{
public C<T> Cast<T>();
}

class C<T> : C
{
public C<T> Where(Func<T,bool> predicate);

public C<U> Select<U>(Func<T,U> selector);

public C<V> SelectMany<U,V>(Func<T,C<U>> selector,
Func<T,U,V> resultSelector);

public C<V> Join<U,K,V>(C<U> inner, Func<T,K> outerKeySelector,
Func<U,K> innerKeySelector, Func<T,U,V> resultSelector);

public C<V> GroupJoin<U,K,V>(C<U> inner, Func<T,K> outerKeySelector,
Func<U,K> innerKeySelector, Func<T,C<U>,V> resultSelector);

public O<T> OrderBy<K>(Func<T,K> keySelector);

public O<T> OrderByDescending<K>(Func<T,K> keySelector);

public C<G<K,T>> GroupBy<K>(Func<T,K> keySelector);

public C<G<K,E>> GroupBy<K,E>(Func<T,K> keySelector,
Func<T,E> elementSelector);
}

class O<T> : C<T>
{
public O<T> ThenBy<K>(Func<T,K> keySelector);

public O<T> ThenByDescending<K>(Func<T,K> keySelector);
}

class G<K,T> : C<T>
{
public K Key { get; }
}

The methods above use the generic delegate types Func<T1, R> and Func<T1, T2, R>, but they could equally well have used other delegate or expression tree types with the same relationships in parameter and result types.

Notice the recommended relationship between C<T> and O<T> which ensures that the ThenBy and ThenByDescending methods are available only on the result of an OrderBy or OrderByDescending. Also notice the recommended shape of the result of GroupBy—a sequence of sequences, where each inner sequence has an additional Key property.

The System.Linq namespace provides an implementation of the query operator pattern for any type that implements the System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable<T> interface.



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